Web Search powered by YAHOO! SEARCH

Stark in forefront for three-year degrees

By Anonymous
Posted Oct 23, 2012 @ 12:00 PM
Last update Oct 24, 2012 @ 07:58 AM
Print Comment

State universities in Ohio have a new mandate to offer three-year degrees in 10 percent of their four-year programs. By 2014, according to the new state law, they must award three-year degrees in 60 percent of their undergraduate programs. This long-overdue innovation already has a tailor-made audience in Stark County.

Thanks to ground-breaking partnerships between universities and local school districts, Stark has the second-largest dual-enrollment program in Ohio, after Cuyahoga County. Through dual-enrollment programs, Stark County students may take college-level classes at their high schools.

In addition, early college programs are enabling students to graduate from high school with two-year associate’s degrees. Canton City School District’s collaboration with Stark State College, for example, has allowed students to graduate with both a high school diploma and a two-year degree since 2009.

Though these programs have been enrolling students for only a handful of years, they have become increasingly popular. The Stark Education Partnership, the nonprofit advocate for a seamless education from pre-kindergarten through higher education, says a new study it commissioned shows that students in Stark County’s 17 school districts have earned or qualified for the equivalent of 14,000 three-hour college courses.

These local students, and many more who will follow them, are prime candidates for the state universities’ three-year degree programs. Stark County students will be among the first to benefit from the programs’ three aims: to keep college students in school (about half never get their degree), to save them money and to prepare them for the work force more quickly.

State universities in Ohio have a new mandate to offer three-year degrees in 10 percent of their four-year programs. By 2014, according to the new state law, they must award three-year degrees in 60 percent of their undergraduate programs. This long-overdue innovation already has a tailor-made audience in Stark County.

Thanks to ground-breaking partnerships between universities and local school districts, Stark has the second-largest dual-enrollment program in Ohio, after Cuyahoga County. Through dual-enrollment programs, Stark County students may take college-level classes at their high schools.

In addition, early college programs are enabling students to graduate from high school with two-year associate’s degrees. Canton City School District’s collaboration with Stark State College, for example, has allowed students to graduate with both a high school diploma and a two-year degree since 2009.

Though these programs have been enrolling students for only a handful of years, they have become increasingly popular. The Stark Education Partnership, the nonprofit advocate for a seamless education from pre-kindergarten through higher education, says a new study it commissioned shows that students in Stark County’s 17 school districts have earned or qualified for the equivalent of 14,000 three-hour college courses.

These local students, and many more who will follow them, are prime candidates for the state universities’ three-year degree programs. Stark County students will be among the first to benefit from the programs’ three aims: to keep college students in school (about half never get their degree), to save them money and to prepare them for the work force more quickly.

Loading commenting interface...

Marketplace
Classifieds
Find Canton jobs
Cars
Homes
YourStomp.com